Top Foods to Boost Mental Health

It’s spring, well, officially at least! But as we all know, cold temperatures can and will stick around for many weeks after the start of spring. To help boost and maintain our mental health on this last final stretch, let’s look at some foods that should be on our plates over the next few weeks. Here are 4 end of winter foods to help boost brain and mental health for a better and brighter spring! Food #1: Fatty Fish Fatty fish, particularly salmon, is a great source of vitamin D and Omega 3 fatty acids and tryptophan. Omega 3 fatty acids have been shown to support brain health and improve mood. Making fatty fish an excellent food option that packs a big punch for improved mental health particularly in this transition from winter to spring. Food #2: Oatmeal Oatmeal is great for blood sugar stabilization and for tryptophan. Oatmeal (plain and simple) is a complex carbohydrate which is like a slow burn. It won’t spike blood sugars. It is not well known for tryptophan, but it sure ranks up there. Tryptophan is a precursor to serotonin, combine this with its blood sugar stabilizing properties and you have a grain that is great for mental health. Food #3: Eggs Eggs, particularly the yolk of the egg is rich in essential vitamins and minerals. Eggs, along with being a great source of protein, just one egg contains about 37 IU of vitamin D. The yolks can also boost your blood levels of tryptophan which is a precursor to serotonin which can help with your mood and sleep. Food #4: When in doubt supplement Vitamin D is a popular supplement, but there are some things to look for. First it is important to get your vitamin D levels checked by your doctor. Do this a couple times a year so you know when or if to supplement. Vitamin D3 is best when it is in a synergistic blend with K2. This helps with absorption. Vitamin D supplements can be toxic when taken in the incorrect dosage, so be sure to check with your doctor first. Dr. Teralyn Sell, Psychotherapist and brain health expert. Visit www.drteralyn.com

Top Foods to Boost Mental Health

It’s spring, well, officially at least! But as we all know, cold temperatures can and will stick around for many weeks after the start of spring. To help boost and maintain our mental health on this last final stretch, let’s look at some foods that should be on our plates over the next few weeks.

Here are 4 end of winter foods to help boost brain and mental health for a better and brighter spring!

Food #1: Fatty Fish

Fatty fish, particularly salmon, is a great source of vitamin D and Omega 3 fatty acids and tryptophan. Omega 3 fatty acids have been shown to support brain health and improve mood. Making fatty fish an excellent food option that packs a big punch for improved mental health particularly in this transition from winter to spring.

Food #2: Oatmeal

Oatmeal is great for blood sugar stabilization and for tryptophan. Oatmeal (plain and simple) is a complex carbohydrate which is like a slow burn. It won’t spike blood sugars. It is not well known for tryptophan, but it sure ranks up there. Tryptophan is a precursor to serotonin, combine this with its blood sugar stabilizing properties and you have a grain that is great for mental health.

Food #3: Eggs

Eggs, particularly the yolk of the egg is rich in essential vitamins and minerals. Eggs, along with being a great source of protein, just one egg contains about 37 IU of vitamin D. The yolks can also boost your blood levels of tryptophan which is a precursor to serotonin which can help with your mood and sleep.

Food #4: When in doubt supplement

Vitamin D is a popular supplement, but there are some things to look for. First it is important to get your vitamin D levels checked by your doctor. Do this a couple times a year so you know when or if to supplement. Vitamin D3 is best when it is in a synergistic blend with K2. This helps with absorption. Vitamin D supplements can be toxic when taken in the incorrect dosage, so be sure to check with your doctor first.

Dr. Teralyn Sell, Psychotherapist and brain health expert. Visit www.drteralyn.com