Tinnitus Revisited: When “Safety” Testing is Unreal!

By Patricia Burke of Safe Tech International, with Michele Hertz of NYSUMA Unreal! un•re•al [ˌənˈrē(ə)l] ADJECTIVE: so strange as to appear imaginary; not seeming real: unrealistic: informal: incredible, amazing An Explosion in Tinnitus/Ringing in the Ears From An Unknown Cause! Miguel Ángel Criado reports  for the Spanish publication El Pais that researchers recently extrapolated data obtained from 100 studies of the global population, in order to approximate the worldwide prevalence of tinnitus. His article states, “Our estimates indicate that, globally, one in seven adults report having experienced tinnitus.  We found severe tinnitus in about 2% of the population. Scanned Document SOURCE About 14% (740 million) of the world’s adults have experienced hearing sounds in their ears or heads that did not come from an external source. European scientists estimated the global prevalence of the condition known as tinnitus, and recently published the results of their study in JAMA Neurology. Tinnitus is almost always a manifestation of another problem, but its causes (etiology) can be very diverse. Sometimes tinnitus comes from an auditory lesion caused by extreme or constant noise, an episode of sudden stress, earwax accumulation, or something more serious like a tumor. This diversity of associated disorders complicates tinnitus research, but scientists agree that the first step is understanding how many people are affected. Generally, tinnitus accompanies, precedes or follows hearing loss or impairment. This is one of the main problems with studying tinnitus. While there are instruments to measure and record detailed information about hearing loss, there is no way to objectively measure the ringing or buzzing that is characteristic of tinnitus – it’s a subjective sensation. To determine prevalence, researchers have to use questionnaires that rely on the responses of the survey participants.” Musicians and Soldiers and Loud Noises Media presentations of tinnitus often feature stories of soldiers exposed to battlefield blasts, and musicians.  An article from Spain notes, “Many international music stars have publicly spoken about their hearing problems: Pete Townshend (The Who), Noel Gallagher (Oasis), James Hetfield (Metallica), Phil Collins, Ozzy Osbourne, Eric Clapton… Some have had to stop playing for a time, such as Brian Johnson from AC/DC. In Spain, the condition particularly affects musicians from “the old school,” bands who started in the 1980s and 1990s. “We used to rehearse in a small room with inhuman levels of volume,” explains Josele Santiago, who has enjoyed a solo career and also sang and played guitar for Los Enemigos. “I didn’t start using protection until it was too late.” Guillem Arnedo, the president of the Union of Professional Musicians, stated, “It’s clear that this disability should be covered and have economic compensation, as is done in other countries in Europe.” “Stress, anxiety, lack of sleep… These are situations that cause tinnitus,” explains Doctor Heitzmann. “And people exposed to noise or loud music have more chances of getting it than the rest of the population. Loud noise or intense music is damaging to the ear. They cause acoustic trauma.” Those Not Exposed to Loud Noise: Microwave Hearing is Not “Tinnitus From An Unknown Source” ‘Countless’ individuals are reporting hearing a hum not sourced from voluntary or involuntary exposure to loud noise, and they are aware that there is a specific external source of the sound. They are not being counted. In the 1960’s Alan Frey did not discount military radar operators who told him that they could “hear radar.” Frey [ ] stood at the edge of the radar beam. “And sure enough, I could hear it, too,” he said. “I could hear the radar going ‘zip, zip, zip’.” Frey went on to establish that the effect was real—microwave radiation from radar (and other source) could somehow be heard by human beings. The “hearing,” however, didn’t happen via normal sound waves perceived through the ear. It apparently occurred somewhere in the brain itself, as microwaves interacted with the brain’s cells, which generate tiny electrical fields. Frey proved also that many deaf people and animals could hear microwave radiation. This phenomenon came to be known as the Frey effect, or simply “microwave hearing.” – Cellular Phone Task Force Microwave Hearing was also described by James Lin in 2007, in his article “Hearing of microwave pulses by humans and animals: effects, mechanism, and thresholds.” He wrote “the microwave pulse, upon absorption by soft tissues in the head, launches a thermoelastic wave of acoustic pressure that travels by bone conduction to the inner ear. There, it activates the cochlear receptors via the same process involved for normal hearing. Aside from tissue heating, microwave auditory effect is the most widely accepted biological effect of microwave radiation with a known mechanism of interaction: the thermoelastic the

Tinnitus Revisited: When “Safety” Testing is Unreal!

By Patricia Burke of Safe Tech International, with Michele Hertz of NYSUMA

Unreal! un•re•al [ˌənˈrē(ə)l] ADJECTIVE:

  • so strange as to appear imaginary; not seeming real:
  • unrealistic:
  • informal: incredible, amazing

An Explosion in Tinnitus/Ringing in the Ears From An Unknown Cause!

Miguel Ángel Criado reports  for the Spanish publication El Pais that researchers recently extrapolated data obtained from 100 studies of the global population, in order to approximate the worldwide prevalence of tinnitus.

His article states, “Our estimates indicate that, globally, one in seven adults report having experienced tinnitus.  We found severe tinnitus in about 2% of the population.

Scanned Document SOURCE

About 14% (740 million) of the world’s adults have experienced hearing sounds in their ears or heads that did not come from an external source. European scientists estimated the global prevalence of the condition known as tinnitus, and recently published the results of their study in JAMA Neurology.

Tinnitus is almost always a manifestation of another problem, but its causes (etiology) can be very diverse. Sometimes tinnitus comes from an auditory lesion caused by extreme or constant noise, an episode of sudden stress, earwax accumulation, or something more serious like a tumor. This diversity of associated disorders complicates tinnitus research, but scientists agree that the first step is understanding how many people are affected.

Generally, tinnitus accompanies, precedes or follows hearing loss or impairment. This is one of the main problems with studying tinnitus. While there are instruments to measure and record detailed information about hearing loss, there is no way to objectively measure the ringing or buzzing that is characteristic of tinnitus – it’s a subjective sensation. To determine prevalence, researchers have to use questionnaires that rely on the responses of the survey participants.”

Musicians and Soldiers and Loud Noises

Media presentations of tinnitus often feature stories of soldiers exposed to battlefield blasts, and musicians.  An article from Spain notes, “Many international music stars have publicly spoken about their hearing problems: Pete Townshend (The Who), Noel Gallagher (Oasis), James Hetfield (Metallica), Phil Collins, Ozzy Osbourne, Eric Clapton… Some have had to stop playing for a time, such as Brian Johnson from AC/DC.

In Spain, the condition particularly affects musicians from “the old school,” bands who started in the 1980s and 1990s. “We used to rehearse in a small room with inhuman levels of volume,” explains Josele Santiago, who has enjoyed a solo career and also sang and played guitar for Los Enemigos. “I didn’t start using protection until it was too late.”

Guillem Arnedo, the president of the Union of Professional Musicians, stated, “It’s clear that this disability should be covered and have economic compensation, as is done in other countries in Europe.”

“Stress, anxiety, lack of sleep… These are situations that cause tinnitus,” explains Doctor Heitzmann. “And people exposed to noise or loud music have more chances of getting it than the rest of the population. Loud noise or intense music is damaging to the ear. They cause acoustic trauma.”

Those Not Exposed to Loud Noise: Microwave Hearing is Not “Tinnitus From An Unknown Source”

‘Countless’ individuals are reporting hearing a hum not sourced from voluntary or involuntary exposure to loud noise, and they are aware that there is a specific external source of the sound. They are not being counted.

In the 1960’s Alan Frey did not discount military radar operators who told him that they could “hear radar.”

Frey [ ] stood at the edge of the radar beam. “And sure enough, I could hear it, too,” he said. “I could hear the radar going ‘zip, zip, zip’.” Frey went on to establish that the effect was real—microwave radiation from radar (and other source) could somehow be heard by human beings. The “hearing,” however, didn’t happen via normal sound waves perceived through the ear. It apparently occurred somewhere in the brain itself, as microwaves interacted with the brain’s cells, which generate tiny electrical fields. Frey proved also that many deaf people and animals could hear microwave radiation. This phenomenon came to be known as the Frey effect, or simply “microwave hearing.” – Cellular Phone Task Force

Microwave Hearing was also described by James Lin in 2007, in his article “Hearing of microwave pulses by humans and animals: effects, mechanism, and thresholds.” He wrote “the microwave pulse, upon absorption by soft tissues in the head, launches a thermoelastic wave of acoustic pressure that travels by bone conduction to the inner ear. There, it activates the cochlear receptors via the same process involved for normal hearing. Aside from tissue heating, microwave auditory effect is the most widely accepted biological effect of microwave radiation with a known mechanism of interaction: the thermoelastic theory.”

Sandaura’s blog “the Hum” has been chronicling suffering caused by “a constant, non-stop “pulsed” low radio frequency hum and drone radiating from global smart grid mesh network” since 2011.

New York for Safe Utility Meter Association Comment

The recent JAMA research on tinnitus ‘from an unknown cause’ was reported in Spain for El Pais.

It was also covered by Christine Fernando, for USA TODAY in her article, Ringing in your ears? About 750 million people have this perplexing condition, study says.

Sean Carney and Patricia Burke of Safe Tech International contacted Christine Fernando with concerns, as reported by Natural Blaze here.

New York for Safe Utility Meter Association also responded.

Dear Ms. Fernando, Thank you for writing the article about tinnitus.

For over a decade, our organization has been contacted by people that are suffering from tinnitus. For each of these people it began after the installation of “smart” utility meters. This problem, also known as “Microwave Hearing,” can be caused by exposure to radiofrequency/microwave (RF/MW) radiation. These frequencies are utilized by wireless technology including cell phones, “smart” utility meters, wifi routers, cell towers, baby monitors, radar and weapons of war.

The following paragraph is taken from a Summary that our organization wrote about “smart” meters:

“By 2010, utility consumers began linking the new meters to developing electromagnetic sensitivity, a federally recognized disability. This condition manifests in a constellation of mostly neurological symptoms after exposure to RFR. Such exposure can cause headaches, memory and cognitive problems, sleep problems, heart palpitations and/or increased heart rate, ringing in the ears, exhaustion, skin rashes, vertigo, tingling in extremities, nose bleeds, burning sensations and more. As a result, some utility consumers are now unable to tolerate RFR from transmitting and non-transmitting digital meters and also from other electronic and wireless devices. For them, an analog meter is imperative.”

There is a very interesting article from GQ that discusses these topics in depth: Warning: Your Cell Phone May be Hazardous to Your Health 

Thank you for your time.  Michele Hertz – President www.NYSUMA.org

Using a Dummy Head

Regulators, industry, and engineers decided that a substance resembling Jell-o could be created that represents the ‘average’ of tissues of the head, including the eyes, the brain stem, the corpus callosum, and both hemispheres, as well as various glands such as the pineal gland, to determine whether or not cell phones are ‘safe.’

SOURCE

There is an operating assumption that there are no other possible mechanisms of harm, other than heating, despite the suffering of those experiencing that “microwave pulse, upon absorption by soft tissues in the head, launching a thermoelastic wave of acoustic pressure that travels by bone conduction to the inner ear.”

What the dummy head cannot convey is that the unnatural, invasive, thermoelastic wave is impacting more than just hearing, and that it is associated with brain fog, sleep disturbance and other adverse effects.

INDUSTRY-REGULATOR STANCE: As long as the Jell-O in the plastic head that represents the average of the various tissues does not get heated up and spike a temperature, we’re home free!

The gelatin-like substance is supposed to represent the average qualities of proteins, fats, and of connective tissue, glands, nerves, bones, the brain, etc. in the head.

INDUSTRIAL-REGULATORY-MEDIA-POLITICAL-ECONOMIC-MILITARIZED STANCE: If consumers report harm, let’s portray it as an imaginary nocebo tin-foil hat psychological issue; a threat to national security and the race against China; an obstacle to covid recovery, economic recovery, progress, and the security of the homeland; and/or a Russian conspiracy.

In 2012, Alan Frey explained, “innovation was not to be suppressed by findings that suggested that such technology was unsafe.“

Scanned Document SOURCE

Researchers apparently have not evaluated microwave exposures alongside microwave hearing mis-categorized as tinnitus. In the same way that Warren Woodward and his colleagues demonstrated that radio frequency exposures were altering the human heart rate, researchers can measure these two things together- microwaves and microwave hearing complaints.

Miguel Ángel Criado and Christine Fernando provided the public with overviews of the JAMA tinnitus study. But where can the public access crucial investigative journalism? Media sources rife with cell phone ads are not a reasonable resource for independent, non-industry science demonstrating harm.

A dummy head is not a safety test, microwave hearing is not ”tinnitus from an unknown source,’ and many individuals are experiencing suffering beyond an inescapable, incessant, irritating, internal vibration in the skull, including damage to the blood brain barrier and neurological damage.

No one wants to admit that while testing cars for speed with a crash test dummy might be useful, measuring the temperature a plastic head filled with Jell-o to assess the health effects of microwave radiation powering wireless devices, including cell phones, is not an investigation of biological effects. Harm is not just about heating. Acceptance of this realization is the challenge for current generations.

As Upton Sinclair noted, “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.”

See more: Tinnitus and Microwave Hearing – Have You Heard? (naturalblaze.com) and Paul Harding, Total EMF Solutions — Real Men Know That Microwave Sickness is Real: 5G/EMF/RF Father’s Day Stories (naturalblaze.com) and Why Educated Parents ARE Concerned About EMFs (naturalblaze.com)