On this day: Sugar Shane Mosley outscores Oscar De La Hoya in welterweight classic

On this day: Sugar Shane Mosley outscores Oscar De La Hoya in welterweight classic Mosley and Oscar De La Hoya let it all hang out during the final round. Photo by Al Bello-Getty Images 17 Jun by The Ring From sparring sessions and amateur bouts as kids to a multi-million dollar superfight between pound for pound warriors. Oscar De La Hoya and Sugar Shane Mosley were part of a very special generation of Los Angeles talent that rose to the top of professional boxing. When they finally faced off at the Staples Center on June 17, 2000, De La Hoya was the biggest star in the sport and Mosley was an unbeaten former lightweight champion with the fastest hands in boxing. Despite a controversial points loss to Felix Trinidad nine months earlier, De La Hoya entered the bout as favorite. The odds reflected The Golden Boy’s superior pro experience and natural size, but the latter was exaggerated. Mosley had competed at 139 pounds as an amateur and killed himself to make 135. In fact, the Pomona native drained himself so much during his title reign that he skipped junior welterweight completely. After being outboxed in an intense opening round, De La Hoya found his groove. He backed Mosley up, cut off the ring, and landed the more effective punches over the first half. Sensing his predicament, Sugar Shane switched up the tactics and began using his quick bursts and footspeed to outmaneuver De La Hoya. He also switched southpaw in the eighth and enjoyed real success. De La Hoya was always in the fight, but the feeling was that Mosley had his nose in front entering the 12th. The pair saved the best for last, unloading all of their artillery in a sensational closing round. The exchanges were elite-level but Mosley landed the memorable blows including two blockbuster rights. A modern-day classic complete, the pair embraced at center ring. When the decision was announced, it was a split decision triumph for Mosley. Both fighters were awarded a 115-113 card, but the deciding numbers favored Sugar Shane by a margin of 116-112. YOU MAY HAVE MISSED SUGAR SHANE MOSLEY: GREATEST HITS GET THE LATEST ISSUE AT THE RING SHOP (CLICK HERE) or Subscribe Please leave this field empty SIGN UP TO GET RING NEWS ALERTS Share this story Ratings | View All Top 6 Pound for Pound 1 2 3 4 5 6 Trending On this day: Henry Cooper almost destroys Muhammad Ali legend before it begins On this day: Antonio Tarver avenges Glen Johnson loss, regains 175-pound championship Robeisy Ramirez aims to become part of the new Cuban elite in boxing David Cuellar stops Yader Cardoza in five on Friday night Eros Correa upsets bantamweight up-and-comer Saul Sanchez by 10-round split decision Schedule | View All 18Jun Artur Beterbiev vs. Joe Smith Jr. (ESPN/ESPN+) 25Jun Murodjon Akhmadaliev vs. Ronny Rios; Jessica McCaskill vs. Alma Ibarra; Jesse Rodriguez vs. Srisaket Sor Rungvisai (DAZN) 02Jul Mairis Briedis vs. Jai Opetaia Facebook RingTV Official Product Shop Now!

On this day: Sugar Shane Mosley outscores Oscar De La Hoya in welterweight classic

On this day: Sugar Shane Mosley outscores Oscar De La Hoya in welterweight classic

Mosley and Oscar De La Hoya let it all hang out during the final round. Photo by Al Bello-Getty Images
17
Jun
by The Ring

From sparring sessions and amateur bouts as kids to a multi-million dollar superfight between pound for pound warriors.

Oscar De La Hoya and Sugar Shane Mosley were part of a very special generation of Los Angeles talent that rose to the top of professional boxing. When they finally faced off at the Staples Center on June 17, 2000, De La Hoya was the biggest star in the sport and Mosley was an unbeaten former lightweight champion with the fastest hands in boxing.

Despite a controversial points loss to Felix Trinidad nine months earlier, De La Hoya entered the bout as favorite. The odds reflected The Golden Boy’s superior pro experience and natural size, but the latter was exaggerated. Mosley had competed at 139 pounds as an amateur and killed himself to make 135. In fact, the Pomona native drained himself so much during his title reign that he skipped junior welterweight completely.

After being outboxed in an intense opening round, De La Hoya found his groove. He backed Mosley up, cut off the ring, and landed the more effective punches over the first half.

Sensing his predicament, Sugar Shane switched up the tactics and began using his quick bursts and footspeed to outmaneuver De La Hoya. He also switched southpaw in the eighth and enjoyed real success.

De La Hoya was always in the fight, but the feeling was that Mosley had his nose in front entering the 12th. The pair saved the best for last, unloading all of their artillery in a sensational closing round. The exchanges were elite-level but Mosley landed the memorable blows including two blockbuster rights.

A modern-day classic complete, the pair embraced at center ring. When the decision was announced, it was a split decision triumph for Mosley. Both fighters were awarded a 115-113 card, but the deciding numbers favored Sugar Shane by a margin of 116-112.