No to Tobacco and E-Cigarettes: Take Down Tobacco Day

March 31 is Take Down Tobacco Day. The theme of World No Tobacco Day 2023 is “We need food, not tobacco” to raise awareness about alternative crop production and marketing opportunities for tobacco farmers and encourage them to grow sustainable, nutritious crops. According to cancer.org, tobacco contains at least 70 chemicals known to cause cancer. Tobacco use can lead to several different kinds of cancer including: ThroatLarynxMouthEsophagusStomachPancreasColonRectumCervix Quitting on Tobacco is Hard, Why? According to HelpGuide.org, quitting can be tough, whether you’re an occasional teen smoker or a lifetime pack-a-day smoker. Smoking tobacco is both a physical addiction and a psychological habit. The nicotine from cigarettes provides a temporary—and addictive—high. Eliminating that regular nicotine fix causes your body to experience physical withdrawal symptoms and cravings. Because of nicotine’s “feel good” effect on the brain, you may turn to cigarettes as a quick and reliable way to boost your outlook, relieve stress, and unwind. Smoking can also be a way of coping with depression, anxiety, or even boredom. Quitting means finding different, healthier ways to cope with those feelings. Someone who smokes may link smoking with social activities and many other activities, too. All of these factors make smoking a hard habit to break. Cut Down Before You Quit Whilst it’s always best to altogether quit smoking, not everyone is ready to stop straight away. It can be helpful to set a quit date within 6 weeks and start cutting down. You can ‘cut down to quit’ cigarettes over that period, by reducing the number of cigarettes you smoke every day, every week, and fortnight until your quit date. NHS inform, a Scotland national health information service suggests, if you choose to gradually cut down the number of cigarettes you smoke each day before stopping altogether, you should: Set goals – think about reducing your cigarettes each day, each week, or fortnightContinue to reduce the number of cigarettes you smoke as you approach your ‘quit date’Use nicotine replacement therapies in the cutting down phase – this help prevent you from compensating for fewer cigarettes by taking more and deeper puffsChange your habits – go for a walk after dinner instead of having a cigarette Quitting any Habit is not easy but Important for your Health. Take a Call today! DisclaimerThe Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

No to Tobacco and E-Cigarettes: Take Down Tobacco Day

March 31 is Take Down Tobacco Day. The theme of World No Tobacco Day 2023 is “We need food, not tobacco” to raise awareness about alternative crop production and marketing opportunities for tobacco farmers and encourage them to grow sustainable, nutritious crops.

According to cancer.org, tobacco contains at least 70 chemicals known to cause cancer. Tobacco use can lead to several different kinds of cancer including:

  • Throat
  • Larynx
  • Mouth
  • Esophagus
  • Stomach
  • Pancreas
  • Colon
  • Rectum
  • Cervix

Quitting on Tobacco is Hard, Why?

According to HelpGuide.org, quitting can be tough, whether you’re an occasional teen smoker or a lifetime pack-a-day smoker.

Smoking tobacco is both a physical addiction and a psychological habit. The nicotine from cigarettes provides a temporary—and addictive—high. Eliminating that regular nicotine fix causes your body to experience physical withdrawal symptoms and cravings. Because of nicotine’s “feel good” effect on the brain, you may turn to cigarettes as a quick and reliable way to boost your outlook, relieve stress, and unwind. Smoking can also be a way of coping with depression, anxiety, or even boredom. Quitting means finding different, healthier ways to cope with those feelings. Someone who smokes may link smoking with social activities and many other activities, too. All of these factors make smoking a hard habit to break.

Cut Down Before You Quit

Whilst it’s always best to altogether quit smoking, not everyone is ready to stop straight away. It can be helpful to set a quit date within 6 weeks and start cutting down. You can ‘cut down to quit’ cigarettes over that period, by reducing the number of cigarettes you smoke every day, every week, and fortnight until your quit date.

NHS inform, a Scotland national health information service suggests, if you choose to gradually cut down the number of cigarettes you smoke each day before stopping altogether, you should:

  • Set goals – think about reducing your cigarettes each day, each week, or fortnight
  • Continue to reduce the number of cigarettes you smoke as you approach your ‘quit date’
  • Use nicotine replacement therapies in the cutting down phase – this help prevent you from compensating for fewer cigarettes by taking more and deeper puffs
  • Change your habits – go for a walk after dinner instead of having a cigarette

Quitting any Habit is not easy but Important for your Health. Take a Call today!