Isao Takahata and His Tale of Princess Kaguya (Japan, 2014)

A documentary about the making of The Tale of Princess Kaguya, Isao Takahata's first feature film for 14 years.This film is a treasure trove for fans of Studio Ghibli co-founder Isao Takahata and his masterpiece The Tale of Princess Kaguya. Very similar to another Ghibli documentary; The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness (2013) in how we get to closely follow the production and inner thoughts of the creators while struggling to get the movie done. Takahata is candid and open to talk about pretty much everything concerning the film, and it's a privilege to walk through the doors of his animation studio. He speaks up about things he regretted doing in earlier films, and describes how the most non-exciting movements are the hardest to animate. One scene shows Takahata driving over to Hayao Miyazaki who's in the middle of making The Wind Rises (2013) and just happen to walk in when he's trying to figure out how fast he should portray the spinning of a vinyl record. Small moments like that makes the film really feel personal and while the production eventually starts to feel like a battle for Takahata, it becomes clear that he put his soul into this film he knew would be his last.Genre: Documentary. 1h 25min.

Isao Takahata and His Tale of Princess Kaguya (Japan, 2014)
A documentary about the making of The Tale of Princess Kaguya, Isao Takahata's first feature film for 14 years.
This film is a treasure trove for fans of Studio Ghibli co-founder Isao Takahata and his masterpiece The Tale of Princess Kaguya. Very similar to another Ghibli documentary; The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness (2013) in how we get to closely follow the production and inner thoughts of the creators while struggling to get the movie done. Takahata is candid and open to talk about pretty much everything concerning the film, and it's a privilege to walk through the doors of his animation studio. He speaks up about things he regretted doing in earlier films, and describes how the most non-exciting movements are the hardest to animate. 
One scene shows Takahata driving over to Hayao Miyazaki who's in the middle of making The Wind Rises (2013) and just happen to walk in when he's trying to figure out how fast he should portray the spinning of a vinyl record. Small moments like that makes the film really feel personal and while the production eventually starts to feel like a battle for Takahata, it becomes clear that he put his soul into this film he knew would be his last.
Genre: Documentary. 1h 25min.