How To Make Wonton Wrappers (a culinary journey)

Today we’re teaching you guys how to make wonton wrappers! These homemade wonton wrappers are perfectly thin, chewy, and slippery, made with just bread flour (AKA high gluten flour), water, and cornstarch. Just pair with your favorite filling and get ready for an amazing bowl of wonton soup!  Why Homemade Wonton Wrappers?  Several of our readers have asked for a wonton wrapper recipe over the years, as they don’t have easy access to Chinese ingredients where they live.  The good news is, the only ingredients you need to get at the store are bread flour and cornstarch. (You may already have these on hand!). The dough is made with flour and water, and then cornstarch is used to keep the dough from sticking.  To get them really thin, a mechanical pasta roller works great, and the result is a professional looking wonton wrapper that makes wontons as beautiful as store-bought ones do!  The Importance of Resting the Dough It’s very important to get the ratio of flour to water right here. You want the dough to be quite firm and even a little dry right after mixing and kneading. If the dough looks perfectly smooth after the initial kneading phase, it’s too wet!  After forming and kneading the dough, you’ll rest it for at least 30 minutes, covered. During that time, you will see your relatively lumpy ball of dough relax, smooth out, and become more pliable.  It will also be at the right level of hydration, making it easy to roll out and form into wontons. If the dough is too wet, it won’t be firm enough to hold its shape.  You’ll need 490g (3½ cups) of bread flour and 237g (1 cup) of tepid water. This amount will make around 2 dozen wrappers. If you’d like to scale the recipe up or down, simply click on the number of wrappers in the recipe card, and then move the toggle left or right to decrease or increase the recipe to the number of wrappers you’re looking for.  Ok, ready to learn how to make wonton wrappers? Let’s get started.  How to Make Wonton Wrappers: Instructions Put the flour in a large mixing bowl. Add the water to the flour and mix vigorously with a rubber spatula until it looks shaggy. Knead with your hands for about 5 minutes, until the dough is lumpy but relatively cohesive. Place the dough on the counter, and cover with an overturned bowl (the bowl you mixed it in is fine). Let the dough rest for 30 minutes, or up to 4 hours.  Meanwhile, make your desired filling. Here are some of our favorites: After resting, the dough will be pliable and appear much smoother. Divide dough into quarters. Work with one quarter of dough at a time, and keep the remaining pieces covered with the bowl. Take your piece of dough and flatten it into a roughly rectangular shape. Then roll it out slightly using a rolling pin, just so it’s thin enough to go into the pasta roller. You can stretch out the corners of the dough to keep it rectangular before rolling. Dust the dough thoroughly with cornstarch on both sides.  Roll out the dough through the roller, starting at the thickest setting, and gradually rolling it through each successive setting. When the dough gets very long, you can cut it in half crosswise to make it easier to handle. You’re done rolling when the dough is just short of paper thin. On my Atlas Italian Pasta roller, it was the second to last setting, setting #5. Dust each side of the dough sheet thoroughly with cornstarch again.  Trim the dough with a knife so you have straight edges, and cut into squares about 3½  to 4 inches (9-10 cm) wide. Then assemble the wontons, use water to seal the wrappers, as you would with any wonton wrapper (see our article on how to fold wontons). It’s best to assemble the wontons as you make the wrappers. Then repeat with the remaining pieces of dough.  What to do with scraps: As you’re cutting away scraps of dough to get those straight edges, you may be wondering what to do with them. You can actually squish these dough scraps back together and put them back under the bowl with the other pieces of dough. This will allow the dough to rest once again, and you’ll eventually be able to take your scrap pile, knead it until relatively smooth, and then roll it out as you did with the other pieces to get a few more wrappers! Cook the wontons or freeze within 1 hour of assembly, or the moisture in the filling may soak through the very thin wrappers, causing cracks and leakage.  To cook the wontons, drop into boiling water while stirring gently to keep the wontons from sticking to the bottom of the pot. Boil for about 5-6 minutes, adding cold water to the pot every time the water comes back up to a vigorous boil. This gives the filling enough time to cook without overcooking the wrapper.  To freeze the wontons, place them on a parchment lined baking sheet, just so they’re not touching. Cover and transfer to the freezer. Freeze overnight until solid, and then transfer to freezer bags to store in the freezer for up to 3 mon

How To Make Wonton Wrappers (a culinary journey)

Today we’re teaching you guys how to make wonton wrappers! These homemade wonton wrappers are perfectly thin, chewy, and slippery, made with just bread flour (AKA high gluten flour), water, and cornstarch.

Just pair with your favorite filling and get ready for an amazing bowl of wonton soup! 

Why Homemade Wonton Wrappers? 

Several of our readers have asked for a wonton wrapper recipe over the years, as they don’t have easy access to Chinese ingredients where they live. 

The good news is, the only ingredients you need to get at the store are bread flour and cornstarch. (You may already have these on hand!). The dough is made with flour and water, and then cornstarch is used to keep the dough from sticking. 

To get them really thin, a mechanical pasta roller works great, and the result is a professional looking wonton wrapper that makes wontons as beautiful as store-bought ones do! 

Bowl of wonton soup

The Importance of Resting the Dough

It’s very important to get the ratio of flour to water right here. You want the dough to be quite firm and even a little dry right after mixing and kneading. If the dough looks perfectly smooth after the initial kneading phase, it’s too wet! 

After forming and kneading the dough, you’ll rest it for at least 30 minutes, covered. During that time, you will see your relatively lumpy ball of dough relax, smooth out, and become more pliable. 

It will also be at the right level of hydration, making it easy to roll out and form into wontons. If the dough is too wet, it won’t be firm enough to hold its shape. 

You’ll need 490g (3½ cups) of bread flour and 237g (1 cup) of tepid water. This amount will make around 2 dozen wrappers.

If you’d like to scale the recipe up or down, simply click on the number of wrappers in the recipe card, and then move the toggle left or right to decrease or increase the recipe to the number of wrappers you’re looking for. 

Ok, ready to learn how to make wonton wrappers? Let’s get started. 

How to Make Wonton Wrappers: Instructions

Put the flour in a large mixing bowl. Add the water to the flour and mix vigorously with a rubber spatula until it looks shaggy.

shaggy dough formed with flour and water

Knead with your hands for about 5 minutes, until the dough is lumpy but relatively cohesive. Place the dough on the counter, and cover with an overturned bowl (the bowl you mixed it in is fine). Let the dough rest for 30 minutes, or up to 4 hours. 

lumpy ball of dough

Meanwhile, make your desired filling. Here are some of our favorites:

After resting, the dough will be pliable and appear much smoother. Divide dough into quarters. Work with one quarter of dough at a time, and keep the remaining pieces covered with the bowl.

Take your piece of dough and flatten it into a roughly rectangular shape. Then roll it out slightly using a rolling pin, just so it’s thin enough to go into the pasta roller. You can stretch out the corners of the dough to keep it rectangular before rolling. Dust the dough thoroughly with cornstarch on both sides. 

flat piece of dough dusted with cornstarch

Roll out the dough through the roller, starting at the thickest setting, and gradually rolling it through each successive setting.

putting dough through pasta roller

When the dough gets very long, you can cut it in half crosswise to make it easier to handle. You’re done rolling when the dough is just short of paper thin. On my Atlas Italian Pasta roller, it was the second to last setting, setting #5. Dust each side of the dough sheet thoroughly with cornstarch again. 

dough rolled by pasta roller

Trim the dough with a knife so you have straight edges, and cut into squares about 3½  to 4 inches (9-10 cm) wide.

cutting dough into squares with straight edges

Then assemble the wontons, use water to seal the wrappers, as you would with any wonton wrapper (see our article on how to fold wontons). It’s best to assemble the wontons as you make the wrappers. Then repeat with the remaining pieces of dough. 

What to do with scraps:

As you’re cutting away scraps of dough to get those straight edges, you may be wondering what to do with them.

You can actually squish these dough scraps back together and put them back under the bowl with the other pieces of dough. This will allow the dough to rest once again, and you’ll eventually be able to take your scrap pile, knead it until relatively smooth, and then roll it out as you did with the other pieces to get a few more wrappers!

ball of dough scraps

Cook the wontons or freeze within 1 hour of assembly, or the moisture in the filling may soak through the very thin wrappers, causing cracks and leakage. 

To cook the wontons, drop into boiling water while stirring gently to keep the wontons from sticking to the bottom of the pot. Boil for about 5-6 minutes, adding cold water to the pot every time the water comes back up to a vigorous boil. This gives the filling enough time to cook without overcooking the wrapper. 

Bowl of wonton soup

To freeze the wontons, place them on a parchment lined baking sheet, just so they’re not touching. Cover and transfer to the freezer. Freeze overnight until solid, and then transfer to freezer bags to store in the freezer for up to 3 months. 

wontons on baking sheet

Enjoy these delicious wonton wrappers!

Wonton soup with homemade wonton wrappers

5 from 3 votes

How to Make Wonton Wrappers

These homemade wonton wrappers are perfectly thin, chewy, and slippery, made with just bread flour (AKA high gluten flour), water, and cornstarch. Just pair with your favorite filling and get ready for an amazing bowl of wonton soup!

How to Make Wonton Wrappers at Home

serves: 24

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Put the flour in a large mixing bowl. Add the water to the flour and mix vigorously with a rubber spatula until it looks shaggy. Knead with your hands for about 5 minutes, until the dough is lumpy but relatively cohesive. Place the dough on the counter, and cover with an overturned bowl (the bowl you mixed it in is fine). Let the dough rest for 30 minutes, or up to 4 hours. Meanwhile, make your desired filling.

  • After resting, the dough will be pliable and appear much smoother. Divide dough into quarters. Work with one quarter of dough at a time, and keep the remaining pieces covered with the bowl.

  • Take your piece of dough and flatten it into a roughly rectangular shape. Then roll it out slightly using a rolling pin, just so it’s thin enough to go into the pasta roller. You can stretch out the corners of the dough to keep it rectangular before rolling. Dust the dough thoroughly with cornstarch on both sides.

  • Roll out the dough through the roller, starting at the thickest setting, and gradually rolling it through each successive setting. When the dough gets very long, you can cut it in half crosswise to make it easier to handle. You’re done rolling when the dough is just short of paper thin. On my Atlas Italian Pasta roller, it was the second to last setting, setting #5. Dust each side of the dough sheet thoroughly with cornstarch again.

  • Trim the dough with a knife so you have straight edges, and cut into squares about 3½  to 4 inches (9-10 cm) wide. Then assemble the wontons, use water to seal the wrappers, as you would with any wonton wrapper. It’s best to assemble the wontons as you make the wrappers. Then repeat with the remaining pieces of dough.

  • Cook the wontons or freeze within 1 hour of assembly, or the moisture in the filling may soak through the very thin wrappers, causing cracks and leakage.

  • To cook the wontons, drop into boiling water while stirring gently to keep the wontons from sticking to the bottom of the pot. Boil for about 5-6 minutes, adding cold water to the pot every time the water comes back up to a vigorous boil. This gives the filling enough time to cook without overcooking the wrapper. See notes for freezer instructions.

Tips & Notes:

Nutrition info is for each wrapper. This recipe makes about 24 wrappers. To freeze the wontons, place them on a parchment lined baking sheet ¼ inch (0.5cm) apart, just so they’re not touching. Cover and transfer to the freezer. Freeze overnight until solid, and then transfer to freezer bags to store in the freezer for up to 3 months.

nutrition facts

Calories: 66kcal (3%) Carbohydrates: 13g (4%) Protein: 2g (4%) Fat: 0.3g Saturated Fat: 0.04g Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.1g Monounsaturated Fat: 0.03g Sodium: 1mg Potassium: 18mg (1%) Fiber: 0.4g (2%) Sugar: 0.1g Vitamin A: 0.4IU Calcium: 3mg Iron: 0.2mg (1%)