How to Combat Severe Jet Lag

Jet lag occurs when our body clock or circadian rhythm is disrupted. The body clock is responsible not only for when we fall asleep and wake up naturally, but also for our feelings of hunger, blood pressure levels and mood. When we try to make significant changes to our circadian rhythm by trying to function in a different time zone, it can cause us to become tired and unwell as well as interfering with tour travel plans. Here are some ways you can combat jet lag to prevent or minimize its impact on your health and wellbeing as well as your enjoyment of your trip. Adjust your sleep pattern gradually Your sleep pattern will change differently depending on where you are travelling to. If you are travelling to the east, you will be trying to fall asleep at night but your body will be ready to wake up. Before you travel, bring your bedtime forward by 30 minutes a night for a week before you travel (and if travelling west, move bedtime 30 minutes later each night). You may also want to start to adjust your meal times so they are closer to meal times in your destination. Combat dehydration Jet lag can feel very much like the flu, i.e., you are likely to feel lethargic, unwell and dehydrated. To prepare your body for the changes ahead, you can undergo IV treatment such as IV flu recovery in LA. The process will deliver fluids and essential vitamins directly to your bloodstream, making you fresh and fully charged ahead of your journey. While you are on your flight try to avoid caffeine (coffee, cola and energy drinks) and alcohol as these will dehydrate you. Start your new routine ASAP When you get on the plane change your watch straight away so you can mentally adjust to the new time zone. Think about whether or not sleeping on the plane will be helpful or if it is best to stay awake for as long as possible. For example, if your new watch-time says it is night, trying to sleep may give you a head start on your new schedule. Plan your light exposure Light exposure is one of the main factors which regulate our circadian rhythm so if you can make adjustments to your light exposure before you travel it can help. There are jet lag apps that can help you to plan your exposure to light depending on where you are travelling to and from. Take an earlier flight If you are travelling to attend a particular event or work meeting, consider arriving at your destination a day or two earlier than you need to be there. This will give you time to adjust your sleep and eating schedule when you have arrived, making it much easier for you to handle. Plan your meals There is such a thing as a jet lag diet which involves eating heavily for a couple of days before you travel and then eating nothing at all on the day of your flight. While there is no scientific evidence that this helps, it may help to load up on carbohydrates such as pasta, bread and rice when you want to fall asleep. When you need to be active and alert, opt for lighter foods with high protein content like fish, meat and eggs.

How to Combat Severe Jet Lag

Jet lag occurs when our body clock or circadian rhythm is disrupted. The body clock is responsible not only for when we fall asleep and wake up naturally, but also for our feelings of hunger, blood pressure levels and mood. When we try to make significant changes to our circadian rhythm by trying to function in a different time zone, it can cause us to become tired and unwell as well as interfering with tour travel plans. Here are some ways you can combat jet lag to prevent or minimize its impact on your health and wellbeing as well as your enjoyment of your trip.

Adjust your sleep pattern gradually

Your sleep pattern will change differently depending on where you are travelling to. If you are travelling to the east, you will be trying to fall asleep at night but your body will be ready to wake up. Before you travel, bring your bedtime forward by 30 minutes a night for a week before you travel (and if travelling west, move bedtime 30 minutes later each night). You may also want to start to adjust your meal times so they are closer to meal times in your destination.

Combat dehydration

Jet lag can feel very much like the flu, i.e., you are likely to feel lethargic, unwell and dehydrated. To prepare your body for the changes ahead, you can undergo IV treatment such as IV flu recovery in LA. The process will deliver fluids and essential vitamins directly to your bloodstream, making you fresh and fully charged ahead of your journey. While you are on your flight try to avoid caffeine (coffee, cola and energy drinks) and alcohol as these will dehydrate you.

Start your new routine ASAP

When you get on the plane change your watch straight away so you can mentally adjust to the new time zone. Think about whether or not sleeping on the plane will be helpful or if it is best to stay awake for as long as possible. For example, if your new watch-time says it is night, trying to sleep may give you a head start on your new schedule.

Plan your light exposure

Light exposure is one of the main factors which regulate our circadian rhythm so if you can make adjustments to your light exposure before you travel it can help. There are jet lag apps that can help you to plan your exposure to light depending on where you are travelling to and from.

Take an earlier flight

If you are travelling to attend a particular event or work meeting, consider arriving at your destination a day or two earlier than you need to be there. This will give you time to adjust your sleep and eating schedule when you have arrived, making it much easier for you to handle.

Plan your meals

There is such a thing as a jet lag diet which involves eating heavily for a couple of days before you travel and then eating nothing at all on the day of your flight. While there is no scientific evidence that this helps, it may help to load up on carbohydrates such as pasta, bread and rice when you want to fall asleep. When you need to be active and alert, opt for lighter foods with high protein content like fish, meat and eggs.