Holistic Winter Wellness Tips: Supercharge Your Immunity, Balance Stress, and Boost Your Energy

Getting ill and struggling with self-care right now isn't really surprising. The winter season can be a difficult time to stay healthy. The days are shorter and the weather is colder, which often means that we spend more time inside and are exposed to more germs.There are some key changes you should make to your routine, since staying well during the winter can be trickier than during the summer. Pay attention to these tips to supercharge your immunity, strengthen digestion, balance stress, and boost your energy during winter. Need a little extra support to stay well this winter? Begin your journey or schedule a followup with a member of our knowledgeable functional medicine team. 1. Adapt to the change Dark winter mornings can make it a little hard to get going, but instead of reaching for more caffeine, a natural pick-me-up might be just what the doctor ordered. Adaptogens such as rhodiola, ashwagandha, and eleuthero (or Siberian ginseng) are used in traditional medicine to elevate energy, increase physical performance, and even balance the body’s stress response.  One study found that health benefits of adaptogens extend beyond mood, and also show potential to enhance physical and mental endurance, support cardiovascular health, and improve metabolism (1). Some adaptogens may also promote resilience to certain cold and flu viruses during the winter months (2). You can find these adaptogens in capsule, powder, or tinctures, or combined in one supplement like HPA Adapt.  2. Beat the blues with B’s A vitamin B complex supplement should be in everyone’s winter wellness arsenal to combat stress and promote a healthy mood. There are a total of 8 B complex vitamins, and they play an active role in metabolism, the immune system, neurotransmitter function, and hormone production. Studies show the health benefits of B vitamins promote a stable mood, while helping the body to be more resilient to stress that's likely to pop up at some point this holiday season. Could B vitamins be one solution to stave off the winter blues? A double-blind randomized, placebo-controlled study found that supplementing with B vitamins for just 12 weeks improved participants’ mood and decreased workplace strain (3). Aside from supplements, you can get more B vitamins from foods like salmon, dark leafy greens, whole eggs, oysters, beans, poultry, and yogurt. Try Boost from the East West Way for metabolically active B vitamins.  3. Boost your immune system The basics of healthy eating, exercise, sleep, and time to recharge are the best way to boost your immune system in the winter months. So if this is your goal, focus on behaviors that help you make better choices involving daily habits. Whether it's cooking more meals at home, getting that new cozy duvet cover to encourage better sleep, or trying a new fitness class, the foundations are truly the best place to focus. You can also add supplements like liposomal vitamin C, magnesium, vitamin D, or zinc. These micronutrients fight free radicals that can weaken the immune system, and help regulate the development and function of immune cells. Read: 6 Steps to Boost Your Immune System with Functional Medicine 4. Make time to recharge While the holiday season typically drums up visions of nights by the fire, gifts, and cheer, many people admit it’s also filled with an “overwhelming amount of physical and emotional discomfort,” according to the American Institute of Stress (4). And because the mind influences the body, prolonged stress can depress immune function and is a risk factor for many illnesses (5). Common physical symptoms of holiday stress may be headaches, insomnia, exhaustion, digestive or respiratory issues, and much more. Experts recommend communicating with family about plans early, setting boundaries to give yourself time to recharge, and creating a schedule for holiday gatherings. If you have a difficult time coping with stressful events, you should learn to spot symptoms of adrenal fatigue.

Holistic Winter Wellness Tips: Supercharge Your Immunity, Balance Stress, and Boost Your Energy

Getting ill and struggling with self-care right now isn't really surprising. The winter season can be a difficult time to stay healthy. The days are shorter and the weather is colder, which often means that we spend more time inside and are exposed to more germs.

There are some key changes you should make to your routine, since staying well during the winter can be trickier than during the summer. Pay attention to these tips to supercharge your immunity, strengthen digestion, balance stress, and boost your energy during winter.

Need a little extra support to stay well this winter? Begin your journey or schedule a followup with a member of our knowledgeable functional medicine team.

1. Adapt to the change

Dark winter mornings can make it a little hard to get going, but instead of reaching for more caffeine, a natural pick-me-up might be just what the doctor ordered. Adaptogens such as rhodiola, ashwagandha, and eleuthero (or Siberian ginseng) are used in traditional medicine to elevate energy, increase physical performance, and even balance the body’s stress response

One study found that health benefits of adaptogens extend beyond mood, and also show potential to enhance physical and mental endurance, support cardiovascular health, and improve metabolism (1). Some adaptogens may also promote resilience to certain cold and flu viruses during the winter months (2).

You can find these adaptogens in capsule, powder, or tinctures, or combined in one supplement like HPA Adapt. 

2. Beat the blues with B’s

A vitamin B complex supplement should be in everyone’s winter wellness arsenal to combat stress and promote a healthy mood. There are a total of 8 B complex vitamins, and they play an active role in metabolism, the immune system, neurotransmitter function, and hormone production. Studies show the health benefits of B vitamins promote a stable mood, while helping the body to be more resilient to stress that's likely to pop up at some point this holiday season.

Could B vitamins be one solution to stave off the winter blues? A double-blind randomized, placebo-controlled study found that supplementing with B vitamins for just 12 weeks improved participants’ mood and decreased workplace strain (3). Aside from supplements, you can get more B vitamins from foods like salmon, dark leafy greens, whole eggs, oysters, beans, poultry, and yogurt.

Try Boost from the East West Way for metabolically active B vitamins

3. Boost your immune system

The basics of healthy eating, exercise, sleep, and time to recharge are the best way to boost your immune system in the winter months. So if this is your goal, focus on behaviors that help you make better choices involving daily habits. Whether it's cooking more meals at home, getting that new cozy duvet cover to encourage better sleep, or trying a new fitness class, the foundations are truly the best place to focus.

You can also add supplements like liposomal vitamin C, magnesium, vitamin D, or zinc. These micronutrients fight free radicals that can weaken the immune system, and help regulate the development and function of immune cells.

Read: 6 Steps to Boost Your Immune System with Functional Medicine

4. Make time to recharge

While the holiday season typically drums up visions of nights by the fire, gifts, and cheer, many people admit it’s also filled with an “overwhelming amount of physical and emotional discomfort,” according to the American Institute of Stress (4). And because the mind influences the body, prolonged stress can depress immune function and is a risk factor for many illnesses (5). Common physical symptoms of holiday stress may be headaches, insomnia, exhaustion, digestive or respiratory issues, and much more.

Experts recommend communicating with family about plans early, setting boundaries to give yourself time to recharge, and creating a schedule for holiday gatherings.

If you have a difficult time coping with stressful events, you should learn to spot symptoms of adrenal fatigue.