An Inside Look Into Diabetic Eye Disease

If you have diabetes, you probably understand the importance of managing your blood sugar levels all the time. One of the reasons you should do this is to avoid problems such as diabetic eye disease in San Antonio, leading to complications including glaucoma and retinal detachment. During its onset stages, diabetic retinopathy may not cause any symptoms, but some people can have mild vision problems. Patients who have had type 1 or type 2 diabetes for a long time have higher chances of developing this problem. Failure to control your blood sugar also puts you at risk of developing diabetic retinopathy. What is diabetic retinopathy? It is an eye condition caused by high blood sugar, which damages the blood vessels in the retina. During the early stages of this problem, symptoms may not be present. However, you may experience blurred vision, fluctuating vision, empty areas in your vision, and floaters when they do. Although common in people with diabetes, this eye complication can be prevented by controlling blood sugar levels. Who is at risk of diabetic retinopathy? Diabetic retinopathy can occur in anyone with diabetes, including type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. However, the risk increases if you have had this health problem for a long time or fail to manage your blood sugar levels. Women who develop diabetes during pregnancy –gestational diabetes are also at risk for this eye complication. Fortunately, you can lower your risk for this problem by using your insulin and taking other diabetes medications as advised by your doctor. Additional eye exams during pregnancy can help expecting women reduce their likelihood of diabetic retinopathy. What can I do to prevent diabetic eye disease? The best way to prevent or lower your risk for diabetic retinopathy is by keeping your blood sugar in a healthy range at all times. You can do this by eating healthy foods, losing extra pounds, engaging in regular exercise, and adhering to your doctor’s instructions on the use of insulin and other medications for diabetes. Work closely with your doctor to ensure your diabetic treatment plan is working. Your doctor can use an A1C test to check for the average blood sugar levels over the past three months. Your doctor can help you set a personal A1C goal for you to meet during each testing. Meeting the set A1C target lowers your risk of diabetic retinopathy. Treatment for diabetic retinopathy The treatment approach your doctor uses depends on how mild or severe your condition is. Patients with a mild form of retinopathy may not need immediate treatment. Otherwise, the doctor monitors your eyes as you work with your endocrinologist to improve your diabetes management. When your blood sugar is at the recommended level, it slows the progression of the eye complication. The following treatments are used for patients with advanced diabetic retinopathy.         Focal laser treatment. Photocoagulation or focal laser treatment slows down or stops the leakage of blood in the eye. It can offer relief from symptoms such as dark strings in your vision.         Injections inhibit the growth of blood vessels and lessen the accumulation of fluid.         Eye surgery to remove blood scar tissue and blood in the middle of the eye. Loss of vision due to diabetic retinopathy can affect your quality of life. If you have diabetes, visit your specialist at Alamo Eye Care to get your eyes checked. 

An Inside Look Into Diabetic Eye Disease

If you have diabetes, you probably understand the importance of managing your blood sugar levels all the time. One of the reasons you should do this is to avoid problems such as diabetic eye disease in San Antonio, leading to complications including glaucoma and retinal detachment. During its onset stages, diabetic retinopathy may not cause any symptoms, but some people can have mild vision problems. Patients who have had type 1 or type 2 diabetes for a long time have higher chances of developing this problem. Failure to control your blood sugar also puts you at risk of developing diabetic retinopathy.

What is diabetic retinopathy?

It is an eye condition caused by high blood sugar, which damages the blood vessels in the retina. During the early stages of this problem, symptoms may not be present. However, you may experience blurred vision, fluctuating vision, empty areas in your vision, and floaters when they do. Although common in people with diabetes, this eye complication can be prevented by controlling blood sugar levels.

Who is at risk of diabetic retinopathy?

Diabetic retinopathy can occur in anyone with diabetes, including type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. However, the risk increases if you have had this health problem for a long time or fail to manage your blood sugar levels. Women who develop diabetes during pregnancy –gestational diabetes are also at risk for this eye complication. Fortunately, you can lower your risk for this problem by using your insulin and taking other diabetes medications as advised by your doctor. Additional eye exams during pregnancy can help expecting women reduce their likelihood of diabetic retinopathy.

What can I do to prevent diabetic eye disease?

The best way to prevent or lower your risk for diabetic retinopathy is by keeping your blood sugar in a healthy range at all times. You can do this by eating healthy foods, losing extra pounds, engaging in regular exercise, and adhering to your doctor’s instructions on the use of insulin and other medications for diabetes. Work closely with your doctor to ensure your diabetic treatment plan is working. Your doctor can use an A1C test to check for the average blood sugar levels over the past three months. Your doctor can help you set a personal A1C goal for you to meet during each testing. Meeting the set A1C target lowers your risk of diabetic retinopathy.

Treatment for diabetic retinopathy

The treatment approach your doctor uses depends on how mild or severe your condition is. Patients with a mild form of retinopathy may not need immediate treatment. Otherwise, the doctor monitors your eyes as you work with your endocrinologist to improve your diabetes management. When your blood sugar is at the recommended level, it slows the progression of the eye complication.

The following treatments are used for patients with advanced diabetic retinopathy.

  •         Focal laser treatment. Photocoagulation or focal laser treatment slows down or stops the leakage of blood in the eye. It can offer relief from symptoms such as dark strings in your vision.
  •         Injections inhibit the growth of blood vessels and lessen the accumulation of fluid.
  •         Eye surgery to remove blood scar tissue and blood in the middle of the eye.

Loss of vision due to diabetic retinopathy can affect your quality of life. If you have diabetes, visit your specialist at Alamo Eye Care to get your eyes checked.