5 Critical Endometriosis Facts You Should Know

Endometriosis is a common condition signified by chronic abdominal pain, painful periods, and heavy bleeding, affecting fertility. Midwood endometriosis specialists offer a diagnosis for the condition to determine the most effective treatment option for the condition. It is important to understand more about endometriosis to know how to detect it and seek help to manage it effectively. It also helps you understand the risk factors that can contribute to the conditions to help you take action early. Here is more information to enlighten you more about the disease. What is Endometriosis? Endometriosis is generally a painful disorder where uterine tissues grow outside the uterus, and it mainly involves the ovaries, fallopian tubes, pelvis tissues. Still, uterine tissue can also be found outside the pelvic area but in rare cases. The tissues thicken and break, bleeding with every menstrual cycle like normal endometrial tissue. But since the tissue has no way out, it is trapped and causes irritation, adhesion, and scar tissue development to the surrounding tissue. The condition leads to pain which can be severe sometimes, particularly during periods, and may cause fertility complications. Fortunately, you can manage the condition through several available treatments. Common Signs While pelvic pain is the primary sign of endometriosis, several factors can hint you are suffering from the condition. Although it is normal to experience cramping during periods, it may be far worse if you have endometriosis and can begin before your periods and extend after alongside lower back and abdominal pain. You may also experience pain with intercourse, excessive bleeding, and pain with bowel movement or urination. Sometimes endometriosis can also cause fertility complications and may be diagnosed when seeking fertility treatment. Other signs you can experience include nausea, constipation, diarrhea, and fatigue. Time to Seek Help Consult your doctor if you encounter any pain or experience other signs that could indicate endometriosis. However, endometriosis may be diagnosed when seeking fertility diagnosis as it could cause fertility issues. Although the condition is not easy to manage, an early diagnosis can call for multidisciplinary measures, leading to better management of the symptoms. Possible Causes The exact cause of endometriosis remains unknown, but several factors are known to contribute to the condition. Retrograde menstruation is one reason you might develop endometriosis, where menstrual blood with endometrial cells fails to flow out of the body but instead flows back to the pelvic cavity. Endometriosis may also be due to induction theory or transformation of peritoneal cells into endometrial-like cells. Other possible causes include: Immune system disorder Endometrial cell transport Surgical scar implantation Embryonic cell transformation Risk Factors While everyone can endure endometriosis, some people are more likely to develop the condition than others. Having higher levels of estrogen, heavy menstrual periods that last longer, or disorders of the reproductive tract can increase your chances of developing endometriosis. Also, beginning menopause early, starting periods early, low body mass index, and short menstrual cycles can also be risky. If one or more of your fast relatives has had endometriosis, your chance of developing the condition is high. Reach out to Dr. Gregory Shifrin, OB/GYN PC, to learn more about endometriosis and understand how you can effectively manage it. Remember that endometriosis is treatable, and there is hope.

5 Critical Endometriosis Facts You Should Know

Endometriosis is a common condition signified by chronic abdominal pain, painful periods, and heavy bleeding, affecting fertility. Midwood endometriosis specialists offer a diagnosis for the condition to determine the most effective treatment option for the condition. It is important to understand more about endometriosis to know how to detect it and seek help to manage it effectively. It also helps you understand the risk factors that can contribute to the conditions to help you take action early. Here is more information to enlighten you more about the disease.

What is Endometriosis?

Endometriosis is generally a painful disorder where uterine tissues grow outside the uterus, and it mainly involves the ovaries, fallopian tubes, pelvis tissues. Still, uterine tissue can also be found outside the pelvic area but in rare cases. The tissues thicken and break, bleeding with every menstrual cycle like normal endometrial tissue. But since the tissue has no way out, it is trapped and causes irritation, adhesion, and scar tissue development to the surrounding tissue. The condition leads to pain which can be severe sometimes, particularly during periods, and may cause fertility complications. Fortunately, you can manage the condition through several available treatments.

Common Signs

While pelvic pain is the primary sign of endometriosis, several factors can hint you are suffering from the condition. Although it is normal to experience cramping during periods, it may be far worse if you have endometriosis and can begin before your periods and extend after alongside lower back and abdominal pain. You may also experience pain with intercourse, excessive bleeding, and pain with bowel movement or urination. Sometimes endometriosis can also cause fertility complications and may be diagnosed when seeking fertility treatment.

Other signs you can experience include nausea, constipation, diarrhea, and fatigue.

Time to Seek Help

Consult your doctor if you encounter any pain or experience other signs that could indicate endometriosis. However, endometriosis may be diagnosed when seeking fertility diagnosis as it could cause fertility issues. Although the condition is not easy to manage, an early diagnosis can call for multidisciplinary measures, leading to better management of the symptoms.

Possible Causes

The exact cause of endometriosis remains unknown, but several factors are known to contribute to the condition. Retrograde menstruation is one reason you might develop endometriosis, where menstrual blood with endometrial cells fails to flow out of the body but instead flows back to the pelvic cavity. Endometriosis may also be due to induction theory or transformation of peritoneal cells into endometrial-like cells. Other possible causes include:

  • Immune system disorder
  • Endometrial cell transport
  • Surgical scar implantation
  • Embryonic cell transformation

Risk Factors

While everyone can endure endometriosis, some people are more likely to develop the condition than others. Having higher levels of estrogen, heavy menstrual periods that last longer, or disorders of the reproductive tract can increase your chances of developing endometriosis. Also, beginning menopause early, starting periods early, low body mass index, and short menstrual cycles can also be risky. If one or more of your fast relatives has had endometriosis, your chance of developing the condition is high.

Reach out to Dr. Gregory Shifrin, OB/GYN PC, to learn more about endometriosis and understand how you can effectively manage it. Remember that endometriosis is treatable, and there is hope.