11 skills you need on your CV to impress international schools in China

       11. Meticulous organizational skillsInternational school jobs in China can be brutal: the workload, demands, and sheer variety of tasks are extensive. If you wish to work in one, you must show the recruiter you’re up to the task. And you can only be up to the task if you’re a master planner and organizer.Once you have those essential skills weaved into your CV, it’ll be time to review what’s missing and what’s hitting it out of the ballpark.Here are a few more CV insider tips we’ve found invaluable over the years:Include a killer personal statement in your CVQualifications are only a minor part of a teacher’s journey. Once you have them, you barely need to revisit them. Yet the most critical long-lasting prerequisites are passion, commitment, and a strong desire to impart knowledge and ethics to young minds. A powerful personal statement is the easiest way to convey these essential attributes.Responsibility and job titles are great to include…but achievements get noticedGone are the days when you could impress a recruiter with a previous fancy-schmancy job title. Nowadays, recruiters are more interested in what you achieved in your roles.Relevance is keyYou may have achieved a great deal in all manner of positions and boast a varied cache of experiences. But if you can’t find a way to relate them all to teaching in some ways (like the travelling example above), don’t waste your precious resume space on them. Flooding your CV with non-teaching related info is not beneficial.Less is more (most of the time)We’d forgive you for thinking your CV must be ten pages long, given all the skills and tips you ought to include. Yet to help you home in on what’s needed, you should remember that your resume is just there to get you an interview. The interview is what will get you the job. That means you shouldn’t dilute your stellar skills and attributes with the 27 extra-curricular activities you had back in high school or your hobbies and interests. The winning formula? Share just enough to entice a call-back but leave some mystery that’ll have recruiters itching to know more.A PGCE (or equivalent) is vital to teaching in an excellent Chinese international schoolYou can probably get a job at an average international school in China without a PGCE (or equivalent teaching certification). Yet these aren’t the kind of schools you’ll be raving home about. You need to have this vital certification listed on your resume for a quality teaching position. If you don’t yet have one, it’s not too late! Several UK universities offer online courses, the most respected being Derby, Sunderland and Nottingham. If you’re in or from the USA, you can get your certification from Mooreland University. Given the teacher shortage in China, some schools will accept your job application if you apply in the same year you complete your course. If you’re currently undertaking a course and will graduate this year, you can certainly apply for a job right now.Don’t switch schools too often (no one wants to hire the teaching ping-pong ball)The only way to show you are responsible and reliable is by showing your loyalty to your employer and any commitment you make. No matter how good a teacher you (think you) are, international school recruiters will steer clear of you if they see you’ve changed schools three times in the last two years. The last thing employers and school coordinators want is a problem teacher, and if there’s anything on your resume that may hint at that, they will swiftly bypass your application.To that end…Choose your Chinese international school job wiselyFor the reason mentioned above, and about a dozen more, you need to be sure you’re accepting the right teaching job in China. The last thing anybody wants is to be stuck in a job they intensely dislike because they fear damaging their resume if they quit their teaching job early. In China, moreover, you need to secure a release letter when you quit your teaching job, which is a colossal ordeal of its own accord. Read more about the importance of a release letter.When preparing your resume to apply for an international school job in China, job skills are essential. Yet you’d be foolish to neglect all those soft skills needed in these unique teaching positions. At the end of the day, school recruiters would rather employ someone with the right personality and drive (and train them) than a perfectly qualified teacher with absolutely no soft skills.It’s surely not rocket science, but if you’re qualified to teach that, then by all means, don’t forget to mention it

11 skills you need on your CV to impress international schools in China

       11. Meticulous organizational skills

International school jobs in China can be brutal: the workload, demands, and sheer variety of tasks are extensive. If you wish to work in one, you must show the recruiter you’re up to the task.

 And you can only be up to the task if you’re a master planner and organizer.

Once you have those essential skills weaved into your CV, it’ll be time to review what’s missing and what’s hitting it out of the ballpark.

Here are a few more CV insider tips we’ve found invaluable over the years:

Include a killer personal statement in your CV

Qualifications are only a minor part of a teacher’s journey. Once you have them, you barely need to revisit them. Yet the most critical long-lasting prerequisites are passion, commitment, and a strong desire to impart knowledge and ethics to young minds. A powerful personal statement is the easiest way to convey these essential attributes.

Responsibility and job titles are great to include…but achievements get noticed

Gone are the days when you could impress a recruiter with a previous fancy-schmancy job title. Nowadays, recruiters are more interested in what you achieved in your roles.

Relevance is key

You may have achieved a great deal in all manner of positions and boast a varied cache of experiences. But if you can’t find a way to relate them all to teaching in some ways (like the travelling example above), don’t waste your precious resume space on them. Flooding your CV with non-teaching related info is not beneficial.

Less is more (most of the time)

We’d forgive you for thinking your CV must be ten pages long, given all the skills and tips you ought to include. Yet to help you home in on what’s needed, you should remember that your resume is just there to get you an interview. The interview is what will get you the job. That means you shouldn’t dilute your stellar skills and attributes with the 27 extra-curricular activities you had back in high school or your hobbies and interests. The winning formula? Share just enough to entice a call-back but leave some mystery that’ll have recruiters itching to know more.

A PGCE (or equivalent) is vital to teaching in an excellent Chinese international school

You can probably get a job at an average international school in China without a PGCE (or equivalent teaching certification). Yet these aren’t the kind of schools you’ll be raving home about. You need to have this vital certification listed on your resume for a quality teaching position. If you don’t yet have one, it’s not too late! Several UK universities offer online courses, the most respected being Derby, Sunderland and Nottingham. If you’re in or from the USA, you can get your certification from Mooreland University. Given the teacher shortage in China, some schools will accept your job application if you apply in the same year you complete your course. If you’re currently undertaking a course and will graduate this year, you can certainly apply for a job right now.

Don’t switch schools too often (no one wants to hire the teaching ping-pong ball)

The only way to show you are responsible and reliable is by showing your loyalty to your employer and any commitment you make. No matter how good a teacher you (think you) are, international school recruiters will steer clear of you if they see you’ve changed schools three times in the last two years. The last thing employers and school coordinators want is a problem teacher, and if there’s anything on your resume that may hint at that, they will swiftly bypass your application.

To that end…

Choose your Chinese international school job wisely

For the reason mentioned above, and about a dozen more, you need to be sure you’re accepting the right teaching job in China. The last thing anybody wants is to be stuck in a job they intensely dislike because they fear damaging their resume if they quit their teaching job early. In China, moreover, you need to secure a release letter when you quit your teaching job, which is a colossal ordeal of its own accord. Read more about the importance of a release letter.

When preparing your resume to apply for an international school job in China, job skills are essential. Yet you’d be foolish to neglect all those soft skills needed in these unique teaching positions. At the end of the day, school recruiters would rather employ someone with the right personality and drive (and train them) than a perfectly qualified teacher with absolutely no soft skills.

It’s surely not rocket science, but if you’re qualified to teach that, then by all means, don’t forget to mention it