The Iconic Pocket Watch: A Brief History Of This Timeless Fashion Statement

A fob watch, sometimes known as a pocket watch, is a sort of pocket watch that is named for the tiny pocket in the vest that is given for this purpose. The timepieces are frequently covered and are generally connected to the vest by a chain or ribbon. At twelve o’clock in the ring, the winding mechanism and time setting wheel are placed.  Until the early twentieth century, when wristwatches were mostly manufactured for women, this was the most popular style of watch. History of the Fob Watch The earliest fob watches are thought to have originated in the late 14th or 15th century. This was around the time the so-called Tudors were first appearing. The most popular ones at the time were covered with lilies, roses, hearts, and florals. In the 17th century, a strip of leather or plaid was sewn to the underside of the top cover to prevent loss of time if the watch accidentally fell out of one’s vest pocket.  A 17th century pocket watch case, with string on the inside to hold the fob watch fob. The leather strap has the initials of the watchmaker, “A.G.,” on it. Source: Library of Congress the Tudor Fob Watch became quite popular during the reign of King Henry VIII. The Early Days Although the pocket watch’s unique shape was probably invented by a 19th-century watchmaker named Thomas Blanchard, it did not gain popularity until the early 1900s, when pocket watches could be made with as little as six parts and sold for about $15.  One of the most popular watch designers of the 20th century was the Scottish Harry Winston. Winston created the Jewelbox watch that looks similar to a jewel box.  By 1920, pocket watches were more common than wristwatches. Winston sold his first Jewel Boxes to the New York Botanical Garden in 1920, but soon received orders from a variety of stores in the U.S., Japan, and England.  The Famous Jewel Box  The New York Botanical Garden received over 120,000 Jewel Boxes from Winston, which was considered a great success. The Modern Era The pocket watch first appeared around 1500 and until the late 1800s, it was used for both practical and aesthetic purposes. Until then, a pocket was a place for keeping the bag or kerchief worn by the lower classes, and only the rich could wear baggier clothes and wear in the pocket as jewelry.  While walking or riding, a watch would be worn and kept busy. This was in fact considered an indispensable luxury for an aristocrat.  In the seventeenth century, a new fashion arose that was found to be more practical and cost effective. Since there was less pressure to carry an expensive watch on the person, pocket watches started to be worn by the lower classes.  The Pocketwatch  The opening of the pocket is achieved by bending the wire and screwing the round plate into the opening. Why Invest in a Fob Watch? Traditional wristwatches, with the exception of extremely expensive models, are considered “precious” items that are considered collectible by some collectors.  “If you’re going to invest in a watch, invest in something that’s really special,” explained David Miles, the owner of Timewise Watches, in an interview with the Laconia Daily Sun. “Something you’re going to be very proud to wear. The Fob watch is part of the great tradition of pocket watches.”  Classic watchmakers made pocket watches long before wristwatches were ever popular, but in the late nineteenth century, manufacturers finally started creating small pocket watches specifically for women. According to Timewise Watches, the pocket watches were made in metal, and sold as “toy watches” to children. How to Choose the Perfect Pocket Watch The size of your jacket and vest, as well as the watch itself, will determine the pocket watch size. On a tiny jacket like mine, a watch small enough for me would be much larger than an average man’s watch. On a large, usually red vest like the one I wear, I would have to get a special pocket watch. It’s all about proportion.  For the same reasons, a pocket watch for a woman is smaller than what she might normally wear. If your vest is not a large number three size, you will want a pocket watch small enough to fit inside, but not large enough that the movement has to be taken out in order to change the time. For smaller women, pocket watches in the size range of 28 mm to 37 mm are generally fine.  How to Care for a Pocket Watch The upkeep of pocket watches is extremely simple.

The Iconic Pocket Watch: A Brief History Of This Timeless Fashion Statement

A fob watch, sometimes known as a pocket watch, is a sort of pocket watch that is named for the tiny pocket in the vest that is given for this purpose. The timepieces are frequently covered and are generally connected to the vest by a chain or ribbon. At twelve o’clock in the ring, the winding mechanism and time setting wheel are placed.  Until the early twentieth century, when wristwatches were mostly manufactured for women, this was the most popular style of watch.

History of the Fob Watch

The earliest fob watches are thought to have originated in the late 14th or 15th century. This was around the time the so-called Tudors were first appearing. The most popular ones at the time were covered with lilies, roses, hearts, and florals. In the 17th century, a strip of leather or plaid was sewn to the underside of the top cover to prevent loss of time if the watch accidentally fell out of one’s vest pocket.  A 17th century pocket watch case, with string on the inside to hold the fob watch fob. The leather strap has the initials of the watchmaker, “A.G.,” on it. Source: Library of Congress the Tudor Fob Watch became quite popular during the reign of King Henry VIII.

The Early Days

Although the pocket watch’s unique shape was probably invented by a 19th-century watchmaker named Thomas Blanchard, it did not gain popularity until the early 1900s, when pocket watches could be made with as little as six parts and sold for about $15.  One of the most popular watch designers of the 20th century was the Scottish Harry Winston. Winston created the Jewelbox watch that looks similar to a jewel box.  By 1920, pocket watches were more common than wristwatches. Winston sold his first Jewel Boxes to the New York Botanical Garden in 1920, but soon received orders from a variety of stores in the U.S., Japan, and England.  The Famous Jewel Box  The New York Botanical Garden received over 120,000 Jewel Boxes from Winston, which was considered a great success.

The Modern Era

The pocket watch first appeared around 1500 and until the late 1800s, it was used for both practical and aesthetic purposes. Until then, a pocket was a place for keeping the bag or kerchief worn by the lower classes, and only the rich could wear baggier clothes and wear in the pocket as jewelry.  While walking or riding, a watch would be worn and kept busy. This was in fact considered an indispensable luxury for an aristocrat.  In the seventeenth century, a new fashion arose that was found to be more practical and cost effective. Since there was less pressure to carry an expensive watch on the person, pocket watches started to be worn by the lower classes.  The Pocketwatch  The opening of the pocket is achieved by bending the wire and screwing the round plate into the opening.

Why Invest in a Fob Watch?

Traditional wristwatches, with the exception of extremely expensive models, are considered “precious” items that are considered collectible by some collectors.  “If you’re going to invest in a watch, invest in something that’s really special,” explained David Miles, the owner of Timewise Watches, in an interview with the Laconia Daily Sun. “Something you’re going to be very proud to wear. The Fob watch is part of the great tradition of pocket watches.”  Classic watchmakers made pocket watches long before wristwatches were ever popular, but in the late nineteenth century, manufacturers finally started creating small pocket watches specifically for women. According to Timewise Watches, the pocket watches were made in metal, and sold as “toy watches” to children.

How to Choose the Perfect Pocket Watch

The size of your jacket and vest, as well as the watch itself, will determine the pocket watch size. On a tiny jacket like mine, a watch small enough for me would be much larger than an average man’s watch. On a large, usually red vest like the one I wear, I would have to get a special pocket watch. It’s all about proportion.  For the same reasons, a pocket watch for a woman is smaller than what she might normally wear. If your vest is not a large number three size, you will want a pocket watch small enough to fit inside, but not large enough that the movement has to be taken out in order to change the time. For smaller women, pocket watches in the size range of 28 mm to 37 mm are generally fine.  How to Care for a Pocket Watch The upkeep of pocket watches is extremely simple.