Taliban says China will maintain its embassy in Afghanistan

Taliban deputy head in Qatar told the Chinese senior minister that the latter would maintain its embassy in Afghanistan. Wu Jianghao, Deputy Foreign Minister of China informed that he held a telephonic conversation with Abdul Salam Hanafi, the deputy head of the Taliban political office in Qatar in which the latter was told to maintain the embassy. A Taliban spokesman tweeted early Friday that China's foreign ministry had promised to keep its embassy in Afghanistan open and to "beef up" relations and humanitarian assistance. Qatar-based spokesperson of Taliban Suhail Shaheen wrote, "The Chinese Deputy Foreign Minister said that they would maintain their embassy in Kabul, adding our relations would beef up as compared to the past. Afghanistan can play an important role in the security and development of the region. China will also continue and increase its humanitarian assistance especially for the treatment of Covid-19". Besides, the Taliban has also asked other countries to reopen their embassies in Kabul that they had shut down soon after the outfit took control of the country. Afghanistan had 36 embassies of various nations in Kabul. And in return, the country had 71 embassies and general consulates in those countries. Many countries suspended their diplomatic presence in Afghanistan due to the recent turmoil. Meanwhile, the Taliban was expected to form a government as early as Friday. The Taliban seized control of the war-ravaged country last month after the Ashraf Ghani-led Afghan government fell on August 15. And, on August 31, US forces also exited from the war-torn country. US forces had stayed in Afghanistan for the last two decades. However, this time, the new Taliban rulers have pledged to be more accommodating than during their first stint in power from 1996 to 2001, which also came after years of conflict -- first the Soviet invasion of 1979, and then a bloody civil war. That first regime was notorious for its brutal and violent interpretation of Islamic law, and its treatment of women, who were forced behind closed doors, banned from school and work, and denied freedom of movement. Subscribe to Mint Newsletters * Enter a valid email * Thank you for subscribing to our newsletter. Never miss a story! Stay connected and informed with Mint. Download our App Now!!

Taliban says China will maintain its embassy in Afghanistan

Taliban deputy head in Qatar told the Chinese senior minister that the latter would maintain its embassy in Afghanistan.

Wu Jianghao, Deputy Foreign Minister of China informed that he held a telephonic conversation with Abdul Salam Hanafi, the deputy head of the Taliban political office in Qatar in which the latter was told to maintain the embassy.

A Taliban spokesman tweeted early Friday that China's foreign ministry had promised to keep its embassy in Afghanistan open and to "beef up" relations and humanitarian assistance.

Qatar-based spokesperson of Taliban Suhail Shaheen wrote, "The Chinese Deputy Foreign Minister said that they would maintain their embassy in Kabul, adding our relations would beef up as compared to the past. Afghanistan can play an important role in the security and development of the region. China will also continue and increase its humanitarian assistance especially for the treatment of Covid-19".

Besides, the Taliban has also asked other countries to reopen their embassies in Kabul that they had shut down soon after the outfit took control of the country.

Afghanistan had 36 embassies of various nations in Kabul. And in return, the country had 71 embassies and general consulates in those countries. Many countries suspended their diplomatic presence in Afghanistan due to the recent turmoil.

Meanwhile, the Taliban was expected to form a government as early as Friday. The Taliban seized control of the war-ravaged country last month after the Ashraf Ghani-led Afghan government fell on August 15.

And, on August 31, US forces also exited from the war-torn country. US forces had stayed in Afghanistan for the last two decades.

However, this time, the new Taliban rulers have pledged to be more accommodating than during their first stint in power from 1996 to 2001, which also came after years of conflict -- first the Soviet invasion of 1979, and then a bloody civil war.

That first regime was notorious for its brutal and violent interpretation of Islamic law, and its treatment of women, who were forced behind closed doors, banned from school and work, and denied freedom of movement.

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