Good Feng Shui Or Great Feng Shui?

What is the difference between good feng shui and “great” feng shui?  First we need to define “feng shui,” as the time-tested, observable assessment of any environment and its impact on the people who function in that environment.  Good feng shui or bad feng shui can be another way to categorize good energy or bad energy and the predictable results. Feng Shui, as a natural earth science, has many layers. There may be 50 items to consider in the grading process and those items can range from the very obvious to the non-obvious. Obvious features tend to be universal, such as a chronically dark house being too “yin.”  Non-obvious features require training and are not immediately palpable. More than ever before, in the spring and summer of 2021, while helping a record number of people house hunt, it became apparent that I had to have “the Talk” with a number of clients.  “The Talk” in this case has to do with being practical and also understanding the desires or expectations during the Feng Shui home search.  Some clients want me to give a letter grade to a house like a report card: A, B, C, D, or F. Some clients openly state at the outset that they just don’t want me to let them choose a Feng Shui “house of horrors” and that having just average or above average Feng Shui will have to do in a seller’s market.  Others want only the best, A+ feng shui.  And others have very specific concerns and non-negotiable deal breakers.  I have even been asked how I would grade my own house.  Ever since I learned Feng Shui, I would not allow myself to live in a house that was not at least B+ or A. One of my few “deal breakers” is the house that is Out of Trigram, mentioned in last month’s Feng Shui newsletter. Some clients know about the Locked Phase that a house can go through and that is a no-go for them, usually based on past experience living in a house in a long termed Locked Phase. Most houses rank about average, possessing both positive and negative traits. But I also see a lot of “bad” feng shui spaces, precisely because people are not doing well and they want to find out if the house has anything to do with their physical, mental, social, or economic difficulties. What is the difference between good feng shui, where people can be generally supported by their home most of the time, and “great” feng shui, which seems elusive or unattainable to so many who inquire? Some of the ways in which a house can achieve the status of “great” feng shui include: When the outside surroundings further support the house type, based on when it was built and its compass alignment. This could be in the form of land levels, street alignment, nearby water sources or mountains. When the house type matches the occupants astrologically. On example could be a “Dui” house with a Dui person living inside.  The Dui House sits West and a Dui person is someone born in certain years like 1957, 1966, 1975, 1984, or 1993.  This might be like saying a Scorpio person living in a Scorpio house. Another aspect to a house which can make it “great” could be one which caters to a certain profession. Some houses are good in particular for artists, lawyers, investors, doctors or any number of other professions. A great feng shui house may also be one which will have a positive influence for many decades to come. One time I saw a house that was so good, I mentioned to my client that they should keep the house in the family and not sell it. Finding house with great feng shui can have a dramatic and quick influence on the occupants when they move in.  It is a combination of having the interior design and room distribution in the most inherently auspicious areas, a supportive outside environment, personal compatibility personal and professionally with the house and enduring qualities which can last more than 20-40 years. Additionally, if the house serves well more than one family member, that is frosting on the cake. Author: Kartar Diamond Company: Feng Shui Solutions ® From the Feng Shui Theiry Blog Series

Good Feng Shui Or Great Feng Shui?

What is the difference between good feng shui and “great” feng shui?  First we need to define “feng shui,” as the time-tested, observable assessment of any environment and its impact on the people who function in that environment.  Good feng shui or bad feng shui can be another way to categorize good energy or bad energy and the predictable results.

Feng Shui, as a natural earth science, has many layers. There may be 50 items to consider in the grading process and those items can range from the very obvious to the non-obvious. Obvious features tend to be universal, such as a chronically dark house being too “yin.”  Non-obvious features require training and are not immediately palpable.

More than ever before, in the spring and summer of 2021, while helping a record number of people house hunt, it became apparent that I had to have “the Talk” with a number of clients.  “The Talk” in this case has to do with being practical and also understanding the desires or expectations during the Feng Shui home search.  Some clients want me to give a letter grade to a house like a report card: A, B, C, D, or F.

Some clients openly state at the outset that they just don’t want me to let them choose a Feng Shui “house of horrors” and that having just average or above average Feng Shui will have to do in a seller’s market.  Others want only the best, A+ feng shui.  And others have very specific concerns and non-negotiable deal breakers.  I have even been asked how I would grade my own house.  Ever since I learned Feng Shui, I would not allow myself to live in a house that was not at least B+ or A.

One of my few “deal breakers” is the house that is Out of Trigram, mentioned in last month’s Feng Shui newsletter. Some clients know about the Locked Phase that a house can go through and that is a no-go for them, usually based on past experience living in a house in a long termed Locked Phase.

Most houses rank about average, possessing both positive and negative traits. But I also see a lot of “bad” feng shui spaces, precisely because people are not doing well and they want to find out if the house has anything to do with their physical, mental, social, or economic difficulties.

What is the difference between good feng shui, where people can be generally supported by their home most of the time, and “great” feng shui, which seems elusive or unattainable to so many who inquire?

Some of the ways in which a house can achieve the status of “great” feng shui include:

  • When the outside surroundings further support the house type, based on when it was built and its compass alignment. This could be in the form of land levels, street alignment, nearby water sources or mountains.
  • When the house type matches the occupants astrologically. On example could be a “Dui” house with a Dui person living inside.  The Dui House sits West and a Dui person is someone born in certain years like 1957, 1966, 1975, 1984, or 1993.  This might be like saying a Scorpio person living in a Scorpio house.
  • Another aspect to a house which can make it “great” could be one which caters to a certain profession. Some houses are good in particular for artists, lawyers, investors, doctors or any number of other professions.
  • A great feng shui house may also be one which will have a positive influence for many decades to come. One time I saw a house that was so good, I mentioned to my client that they should keep the house in the family and not sell it.

Finding house with great feng shui can have a dramatic and quick influence on the occupants when they move in.  It is a combination of having the interior design and room distribution in the most inherently auspicious areas, a supportive outside environment, personal compatibility personal and professionally with the house and enduring qualities which can last more than 20-40 years. Additionally, if the house serves well more than one family member, that is frosting on the cake.