As movement curbs persist, Malaysian fishermen and farmers grapple with lower demand and logistics issues

KUALA LUMPUR: It has become less easy to make a living catching fish, said Rosmadi Ramli, 46, who has just returned from the sea late Thursday (Aug 5) evening with his son.Sailing out for two days and one night, Mr Rosmadi’s catch comprised many different types of fish. “What we net, we will try to sell at the market.” “The only problem is that these days, it’s become much harder to sell our fish to outsiders because of movement restrictions,” Mr Rosmadi, who lives in the fishing village of Setiu, Terengganu, said. Previously, middlemen and dining establishments in the Klang Valley and other towns would come to make their picks and the fishermen could earn decent income. These days, the only place to sell is at the local market, leading to an oversupply and consequently, a drop in local market prices for their catch, hurting the income of the fishermen. Elsewhere, the pandemic has also dealt a blow to vegetable growers, who have to grapple with lower demand as well as disruptions in logistics.  Farmers in Cameron Highlands were earlier hit by movement curbs that prevented them from tending to their farms. Aside from that, they also have to deal with the occasional closure of the wholesale market in the Klang Valley, which is the main distribution centre for their produce. 

As movement curbs persist, Malaysian fishermen and farmers grapple with lower demand and logistics issues

KUALA LUMPUR: It has become less easy to make a living catching fish, said Rosmadi Ramli, 46, who has just returned from the sea late Thursday (Aug 5) evening with his son.

Sailing out for two days and one night, Mr Rosmadi’s catch comprised many different types of fish.

“What we net, we will try to sell at the market.”

“The only problem is that these days, it’s become much harder to sell our fish to outsiders because of movement restrictions,” Mr Rosmadi, who lives in the fishing village of Setiu, Terengganu, said.

Previously, middlemen and dining establishments in the Klang Valley and other towns would come to make their picks and the fishermen could earn decent income.

These days, the only place to sell is at the local market, leading to an oversupply and consequently, a drop in local market prices for their catch, hurting the income of the fishermen.

Elsewhere, the pandemic has also dealt a blow to vegetable growers, who have to grapple with lower demand as well as disruptions in logistics. 

Farmers in Cameron Highlands were earlier hit by movement curbs that prevented them from tending to their farms. Aside from that, they also have to deal with the occasional closure of the wholesale market in the Klang Valley, which is the main distribution centre for their produce.