Acupuncture Tinnitus Relief For Cervical Spine Patients

Acupuncture is efficacious for the treatment of tinnitus related to cervical spine disorders, confirmed by Second Affiliated Hospital of Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine researchers. In the investigation, electroacupuncture outperformed manual acupuncture and produced an 86.7% total effective rate. [1] The success rate of the manual acupuncture group was slightly lower at 83.3%. Learn more about this treatment protocol at HealthCMi acupuncture continuing education online. In the electroacupuncture group, there were 18 fully recovered cases and 6 significantly effective cases, combining to produce a total efficacy rate of 86.7%. Upon completion of the treatment, the Tinnitus Severity Assessment Scale (TSIS) for the electroacupuncture group presented a more marked change from 4.77 ±1.04 to 2.03 ±1.50, whereas the change of the manual acupuncture group was from 4.67 ±1.12 to 2.93 ±1.66. Average blood flow velocity of the anterior vertebral artery rose 6.281 cm/s and average blood flow velocity of the basal artery rose 6.794 cm/s in the electroacupuncture group. The figures for the manual acupuncture group were 2.384 and 2.471 respectively. The study used a sample of 64 patients admitted into the hospital. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groupsm, with 32 cases in each group. Two cases dropped from each group. For the electroacupuncture group initial intake, 19 were males and 11 were females. Average age was 54.4 ±8.52 years. Average course of disease was 9.87 ±5.56. Average blood flow velocity of the anterior vertebral artery was 27.66 ±4.04 cm/s. Average blood flow velocity of the basal artery was 26.06 ±2.86 cm/s. Tinnitus Severity Assessment Scale (TSIS) was 4.77 ±1.04. For the manual acupuncture group, 16 were males and 14 were females. Average age was 54.4 ±8.13 years. Average course of disease was 8.43 ±4.60. Average blood flow velocity of the anterior vertebral artery was 29.14 ±3.99 cm/s. Average blood flow velocity of the basal artery was 25.99 ±3.38 cm/s. TSIS was 4.67 ±1.12. Diagnosis criteria included patients complaining of tinnitus and history of cervical spondylosis. Course of disease could be paroxysmal or persistent. Recording of symptoms aggravated due to internal emotional factors and external stimulation was entered into the data. Also recorded were movements of the head and neck that induced or worsened symptoms. Regular hearing tests and otoscope examinations showed cochlear or postcochlear lesions. X-rays of the neck and spine showed visible changes for all patients. Both groups were given treatment once or twice per day for 21 days, with a one-day break after every six consecutive days. For the acupuncture groups, 0.35 mm × 40 mm needles were used. The following points were chosen: EX-B2 (Jiaji) TE17 (Yifeng) SI19 (Tinggong) GB8 (Shuaigu) GB2 (Tinghui) Needles were retained for 30 minutes after achieving deqi. Needles were twisted and thrust every 5 to 10 minutes. For the electroacupuncture group, a Changcheng Brand KWD-808I electroacupuncture device was used to provide a sparse- wave. Needles on Jiaji points were connected to the device. Intensity was gradually set to patient tolerance levels. The results demonstrate that acupuncutre eliminates or reduces the intensity of ear ringing. The data confirms other recent research and also reflects an important trend in treatment for this condition. The protocol for treatment includes consecutive acupuncture sesssions to achieve clinical results. Note:1. Wang Chunyin, Sun Zhongren, Yang Tiansong, Wang Linjin, Sun Chonghua, Clinical Observation on Treating Cervical Tinnitus With Sparse-wave Electroacupuncture, Liaoning Journal of TCM, 2020, Vol 47, 9.

Acupuncture Tinnitus Relief For Cervical Spine Patients

Acupuncture is efficacious for the treatment of tinnitus related to cervical spine disorders, confirmed by Second Affiliated Hospital of Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine researchers. In the investigation, electroacupuncture outperformed manual acupuncture and produced an 86.7% total effective rate. [1] The success rate of the manual acupuncture group was slightly lower at 83.3%. Learn more about this treatment protocol at HealthCMi acupuncture continuing education online.

In the electroacupuncture group, there were 18 fully recovered cases and 6 significantly effective cases, combining to produce a total efficacy rate of 86.7%. Upon completion of the treatment, the Tinnitus Severity Assessment Scale (TSIS) for the electroacupuncture group presented a more marked change from 4.77 ±1.04 to 2.03 ±1.50, whereas the change of the manual acupuncture group was from 4.67 ±1.12 to 2.93 ±1.66. Average blood flow velocity of the anterior vertebral artery rose 6.281 cm/s and average blood flow velocity of the basal artery rose 6.794 cm/s in the electroacupuncture group. The figures for the manual acupuncture group were 2.384 and 2.471 respectively.

The study used a sample of 64 patients admitted into the hospital. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groupsm, with 32 cases in each group. Two cases dropped from each group. For the electroacupuncture group initial intake, 19 were males and 11 were females. Average age was 54.4 ±8.52 years. Average course of disease was 9.87 ±5.56. Average blood flow velocity of the anterior vertebral artery was 27.66 ±4.04 cm/s. Average blood flow velocity of the basal artery was 26.06 ±2.86 cm/s. Tinnitus Severity Assessment Scale (TSIS) was 4.77 ±1.04.

For the manual acupuncture group, 16 were males and 14 were females. Average age was 54.4 ±8.13 years. Average course of disease was 8.43 ±4.60. Average blood flow velocity of the anterior vertebral artery was 29.14 ±3.99 cm/s. Average blood flow velocity of the basal artery was 25.99 ±3.38 cm/s. TSIS was 4.67 ±1.12.

Diagnosis criteria included patients complaining of tinnitus and history of cervical spondylosis. Course of disease could be paroxysmal or persistent. Recording of symptoms aggravated due to internal emotional factors and external stimulation was entered into the data. Also recorded were movements of the head and neck that induced or worsened symptoms. Regular hearing tests and otoscope examinations showed cochlear or postcochlear lesions. X-rays of the neck and spine showed visible changes for all patients.

Both groups were given treatment once or twice per day for 21 days, with a one-day break after every six consecutive days. For the acupuncture groups, 0.35 mm × 40 mm needles were used. The following points were chosen:

  • EX-B2 (Jiaji)
  • TE17 (Yifeng)
  • SI19 (Tinggong)
  • GB8 (Shuaigu)
  • GB2 (Tinghui)

Needles were retained for 30 minutes after achieving deqi. Needles were twisted and thrust every 5 to 10 minutes. For the electroacupuncture group, a Changcheng Brand KWD-808I electroacupuncture device was used to provide a sparse- wave. Needles on Jiaji points were connected to the device. Intensity was gradually set to patient tolerance levels.

The results demonstrate that acupuncutre eliminates or reduces the intensity of ear ringing. The data confirms other recent research and also reflects an important trend in treatment for this condition. The protocol for treatment includes consecutive acupuncture sesssions to achieve clinical results.